Wednesday, January 11, 2017

Cabrillo Tidepools

San Diego Metro KOA
Cula Vista, CA
January 10, 2017

I visit the beach to walk and enjoy the pups and surf.  I go to the tide pools to explore and experience.  Yesterday, the low tide was at 2:03 pm and the weather cooperated for a fun day of doing just that...exploring and experiencing.  I'll say from the get-go, I didn't see many marine species.  A disappointment yes, but that didn't spoil my excitement for looking and being there. 

The Kellet's Whelk is the largest sea snail.  





 The home of a Wavy Turban Snail (characterized by having a heavily sculptured spiral shell) sits on a clump of surf grass. 
 The algae was especially brilliant.
































Once these Gooseneck Barnacles attach to the rocks as larvae, they do not move their entire lives. 
 A Bat Star hiding under a rock.  
The solitary sea anemone is the largest of the Southern California anemones. Their color comes from the symbiotic algae that live in them.


Sand-castle worms are tube builders and almost always found in a colony.  Even though the worm is only 2 inches long, they cement together tiny grains of sand and shells to create reefs up to 6 feet long. 
Exploring works up an appetite. Snack with a view...
 And one last look before we go...



 The ride to the tidepools at Point Loma take you through Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery.  It's a beautiful and somber drive.




Until next time, let the good times roll.

 HAPPY TRAILS !


P.S. Check out last years tidepool day in the featured post  (top right side tool bar).  I saw three stars !

13 comments:

  1. The cold weather and storm surges may have influenced the amount of diversity in the tide pools, glad your enjoyment of them was still intact.

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    1. Good point Jeff. I can't wait to go back!

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  2. I so love tidepooling on those minus tide days! We went yesterday at the end of Sunset Cliffs Blvd. and saw lots of sea hares (sea slugs), a lobster, some key hole limpets and an abalone! It was the most productive tidepooling we've had in years. No sea stars though, you were fortunate to see one since they've been dying off on the west coast.

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    1. I loved your Facebook pictures Lisa! Our day wasn't quite as exciting, but still fun and so colorful! It's just great being there!

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  3. What a lot of beauty and color:) It looked like a great day to me:) Thanks for sharing so much information. My knowledge is limited to sea stars and anemone:) I love your header...the crashing waves and the gull...perfect! Great photo of you:)

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    1. Thanks Pam! The header photo was one of those lucky shots you discover when you get home! I hope to go again before we leave!

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  4. I love, love, love when you post photos from the tide pools. The creatures of the sea are so beautiful & fascinating. I have never seen a tidal pool but it is on my bucket list.

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    1. They are amazing Gayle. I hope to return again before we leave. The chart shows another sub-zero tide in the afternoon around Jan 26th. I'm just hoping the weather cooperates! We have experienced more rainy, cloudy, chilly days this visit than ever before.

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    2. It appears this winter has been a hard one everywhere. Too much rain, not enough rain, ice storms, ...

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  5. What a beautiful day to enjoy the tide pools - thanks for sharing :-) I know some people like those barnacles..... Love the bi-wing fly over!!

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    1. Thanks Jodee....one of those lucky shots! I can spend hours and hours there and not get bored!

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  6. I love tide pools and used to do it growing up in the Philippines, but what you see there are colorful and interesting.
    This has remained in the wish list of places to go. Great captures. Gay.

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